4 Steps to Write Inclusion into Your IEP Goals

Event Recap
Mar. 17, 2022Updated Jul. 8, 2022
IEP goals drive services and placement, making them perhaps the most important part of an IEP. If you’re looking for an inclusive setting for your child, how do you know what kinds of goals will work in a general education classroom, and how do you write them in a way that will lead to that placement? We talked to Dr. Caitlin Solone, education advocate and faculty at UCLA, on March 10, 2022, and she outlined four steps to write inclusive goals into an IEP. Here's what you need to know!

Step 1: Write a vision statement

A vision statement is the first place to start when developing IEP goals because it provides a big-picture look at your dreams for your child's future—and their dreams for themselves. Listen to this clip for an overview of why vision statements are important and some examples of what they could sound like.

Step 2: Align academic goals with the state standards

The primary goal of inclusion is ensuring that your child can spend as much time among their peers in a general education setting as possible. This means your child's academic goals should be in line with what their non-disabled peers are learning. Listen to Dr. Solone's advice in this clip about why this is important and how the Core Content Connectors come into play for kids who struggle to meet grade-level standards:

Step 3: Identify supports needed in a gen ed setting

Once you've identified the most important academic skills for your child to learn during the year, think about what accommodations or modifications they will need to be successful in gaining those skills, and then write those into the IEP. Dr. Solone explains in this clip some examples of tools and resources that may help kids successfully meet their goals:

One question that came up in the chat during our live event was from Anupama G: "If your child has never been in gen ed, how would you know if he could thrive there?" Undivided Navigator and fellow parent Iris Barker responded, "I understand you, Anupama. I asked myself the same question, and at that point, we just did not know she would thrive, so we [thought we] might as well try being included and take it from there."

Undivided's education advocate Lisa Carey said, "Honestly? You can’t know until you try. It is important to make sure the best possible supports are set up in advance so that your child has the best possible chance to thrive."

Step 4: Use specific language that promotes inclusion

Using phrases in your IEP like "while working with non-disabled peers" or "in a collaborate group where non-disabled peers can check their work" helps promote inclusion by making it part of the goal itself. In this clip, Dr. Solone explains how you can specify the setting in an IEP goal:

Use a template

To help you incorporate these four steps for inclusive IEP goal writing, we've put together a template for planning academic goals. Check out the PDF here.

If you missed the event or want to review what we learned, you can watch the full recording here. If you have questions about preparing for your next IEP meeting, make sure to attend our next live event to ask your question in the chat and hear from our experts and fellow parents! Keep an eye on our Facebook page to learn more.

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Contents


Overview

Step 1: Write a vision statement

Step 2: Align academic goals with the state standards

Step 3: Identify supports needed in a gen ed setting

Step 4: Use specific language that promotes inclusion

Use a template

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