Our Best-Of List of Adaptive Tools and Supplies

Article
Aug. 9, 2022Updated Oct. 5, 2022
When it comes to providing accommodations and adaptive tools to help students access their classroom and curriculum, the possibilities are seemingly endless. In the best cases, a school’s occupational and physical therapists work closely with a child to determine the right equipment to support their strengths and needs. Those same accommodations often come home so parents can help reinforce strategies that are working while helping their child with homework and more. But sometimes finding the right tools can take a little trial and error, so we reached out to Kimberly Gardener at Therapy Place for Kids for her recommendations and also surveyed the parent-staff members of Undivided to put together this best-of list.

Tools to support low vision

Tools to support fine motor development

Tools for sensory input

Tools to support executive function

  • Smartwatch
    • Octopus Watch³ : Empowers kids by teaching good habits and the concept of time. Optional gentle vibrations when a reminder pops up.
    • Dirrelo Smart Watch — Undivided parent Carrie says: I connected a Google Calendar account to it so he gets reminders about his schedule and he can see text messages we send him.

Tools for academic support

Tools for daily living

Other tips from parents

  • Undivided parent Leslie says: This place — Enabling Devices — is a gem, and many school districts contract with them for low-incidence equipment so it is an easy pathway if items are in an IEP. They have the most ingenious switches and sensory products. Also, the beginning of the year is also a great time to check items used at school and in transport to school for signs of fraying or other wear-and-tear. Straps, buckles, Velcro closures, anything that has a foam insert (is a new insert needed?). Safety and comfort are primo!

  • Undivided parent Lindsay says: Don’t forget to pack an extra of everything your child might lose or need to change like a change of clothes, extra masks, extra glasses cord, extra hearing aid batteries, etc.!

  • Undivided parent Lisa says: I send a wet bag with a change of clothes inside and an extra wet bag. That way if clothes get wet or dirty, they can be contained in the wetbag.

Do you have any tried-and-true adaptive tools, tricks, or insights to share? Please let us know and we’ll add them to the list.

Make sure to check out our back-to-school toolkit for more checklists and resources!

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Contents


Overview

Tools to support low vision

Tools to support fine motor development

Tools for sensory input

Tools to support executive function

Tools for academic support

Tools for daily living

Other tips from parents

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