3 Parts of an IEP You Should Know About

Event Recap
May. 24, 2022Updated Jul. 14, 2022
In our IEP Starter Kit series, Undivided’s Education Advocate Lisa Carey covered all the basics to help you get through your next (or first!) IEP meeting with confidence. During our live event on March 31, 2022, she explained some important aspects of IEPs that help ensure our kids have all the supports they need in school. Here are the top takeaways from the event!

Include a Behavior Intervention Plan

FBA and BIP are two common acronyms you’ll likely see in an IEP, and they have important differences. A Functional Behavioral Assessment is simply the data collected about a child’s behavior, including what happens before, during, and after the behavior. Your IEP team will use that data to create a Behavioral Intervention Plan in the IEP. In this clip, Lisa explains what a BIP is, and why it’s important to address it in your IEP.

Spell out plans to address safety concerns

When you have behavioral or medical safety concerns, make sure you document them. (As parent Melissa A. commented during our live event, “Get it in writing!!!”) Before your IEP meeting, draft a letter to the school about your concerns and ask that it be included in your child’s file.

Then, during the IEP meeting, you and your IEP team can write down what the teacher and other staff members should do to prevent those dangers from occurring as well as how staff needs to handle issues if they come up. In this clip, Lisa offers some examples of safety concerns and how the IEP should address them.

Understand your placement options

An IEP will spell out your child’s educational placement. The least restrictive environment (LRE) is a general education classroom, so the discussion of your child’s placement will start there and move toward adding more supports. The IEP should also state what percentage of time your child will spend in the general education environment. Listen to this clip for Lisa’s explanation of what that means and how to ask your IEP team for clarification on what your child’s day will actually look like.

Final tips from an experienced parent

Lisa isn’t just an Education Advocate; she’s a fellow parent with years of experience attending IEP meetings for her own children. One of her recommendations is to request your child’s assessments in advance of the IEP meeting so that you have time to process the information and attend the meeting prepared to advocate for your child. Check out this clip for more tips to help you be prepared and stay calm during the meeting.

Watch the full recording

If you missed the event or want to review what we learned, you can watch the full recording here. If you have questions about addressing IEP concerns with your school district, make sure to attend our next live event to ask your question in the chat and hear from our experts and fellow parents! Keep an eye on our Facebook page to learn more.
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Contents


Overview

Include a Behavior Intervention Plan

Spell out plans to address safety concerns

Understand your placement options

Final tips from an experienced parent

Watch the full recording

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